Business Plan Outline
Non-disclosure
1.0 Executive Summary
   1.1 Mission Statement
   1.2 The Enterprise
   1.3 Key Personnel
   1.4 The Market
   1.5 The Offering
   1.6 Marketing Strategy
   1.7 Competition
   1.8 Projections
   1.9 Resource Requirements
   1.10 Key Issues
2.0 The Enterprise
   2.1 Objectives
   2.2 History
   2.3 Organization
     2.3.1 Key Personnel
     2.3.2 Personnel Count
   2.4 Operations
   2.5 The Future
3.0 The Market
   3.1 Market Segments
   3.2 Prospects
   3.3 Prospect Objectives
   3.4 Segmentation
   3.5 Size
   3.6 Environment
   3.7 Alternatives
4.0 The Offering
   4.1 Description
   4.2 Market Status
   4.3 Value
   4.4 Cost to Produce
   4.5 Support
5.0 Marketing Strategy
   5.1 Targets
   5.2 Image
   5.3 Promotion
     5.3.1 Internet Web Site
     5.3.2 Publicity
     5.3.3 Advertising
   5.4 Pricing
   5.5 Sales
   5.6 Distribution
   5.7 Logistics
   5.8 Support
6.0 Competitive Analysis
7.0 Development Program
   7.1 Objectives
   7.2 Organization
   7.3 Market Status
   7.4 Schedules
   7.5 Technology
8.0 Operations / Production
   8.1 Organization
   8.2 Suppliers
   8.3 Sub-contractors
   8.4 Technology
   8.5 Quality
   8.6 Inventory
9.0 Investment Capital
   9.1 Initial Funding
   9.2 Use of Funds
   9.3 Return on Investment
10.0 Historical Financials
   10.1 Income Statement
   10.2 Balance Sheet
   10.3 Cash Flow
11.0 Financial Projections
   11.1 Year One Income Statement
   11.2 Year Two Income Statement
   11.3 Five Year Income Statement
   11.4 Year One Cash Flow
   11.5 Year Two Cash Flow
   11.6 Five Year Cash Flow
   11.7 Balance Sheet
12.0 Financial Alternatives
   12.1 Best Case
   12.2 Worst Case
13.0 Financial Addendums
   13.1 Assumptions
   13.2 Ratios
   13.3 Income Statement Comparison
   13.4 Balance Sheet Comparison

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5.3 Promotion

Explanation

There are two basic promotion strategies, PUSH and PULL.

The PUSH strategy maximizes the use of all available channels of distribution to "push" the offering into the marketplace. This usually requires generous discounts or commissions to achieve the objective of giving the channels incentive to promote the offering, thus minimizing your need for advertising.

The PULL strategy requires direct interface with the end-user of the offering. Use of channels of distribution is minimized during the first stages of offering promotion and a major commitment to advertising is required. The objective is to "pull" the prospects into the various channel outlets creating a demand for the offering the channels cannot ignore.

Describe your promotion strategy. Factors to consider:
Offering price
Offering quality
Relationships with channels
Competitors relationships with channels
Channel discount requirements
Potential for publicity
Avenues for advertising
Kind of offering

Sample from CitiLoc, Inc.

There are a number of ways we will promote our service, all basically being a PULL strategy. These include:

A CitiLoc employee acting as the personal coordinator for each city in the data base.
A one page flyer in each city's packet of literature sent to prospective businesses.
A link from each city's web page (if one exists) to our web page.
Links with other relevant web pages throughout the Internet.
Each search engine on the web will be fully indexed to find our site.
A strong push to gain publicity about our web site.
Advertising in strategic planning, financial and human resource publications.
A direct mail program to inform top level business management of our service.